Summer Boho Vibe | Papercut’s Kochi Kimono

Kochi Kimono | Style Maker Fabrics

I have been on the search for the perfect kimono pattern for a while. Something shorter, a bit more fitted, just a simple, classic style. In searching I felt a little like Goldilocks—lots of patterns that were close but not quite right. Then, Papercut Patterns released the Kochi Kimono! Slightly more fitted through the shoulders and the sleeves aren’t too wide, this pattern combines all of the elements that I was looking for into one nice package!

Papercut Kochi Kimono | Style Maker Fabrics

Now to pick fabric to compliment Papercut’s Kochi. As it is still summer and quite warm here in the Pacific Northwest, I thought go with something light weight and with great drape. I also love that Anthro-inspired Bohemian style which lead me to choosing this amazing block print rayon challis.

Now to get cutting and sewing! If you have sewn with Papercut before you know these patterns run big, I am typically a medium but in their patterns I always make a small. To keep with the classic look I am going for I selected View C of the Kochi—no pockets or tie and added neckband. In looking at the finished garment measurements, the finished length was a bit shorter than I wanted it to be. I decided to add an 2″ to the body length, making the hem hit right about my hip. I added the length in the bottom third of the front and back pattern pieces. The back piece is almost square making this change very easy. The front required a little extra tweaking as one side of the piece tapers a bit. Don’t forget to also add the length to the neckband pieces!

Papercut Kochi Versions | Style Maker Fabrics

Sewing my Kochi together, ALL of the raw edges are finished with my serger. The pattern clearly directs you when to finish the edge before sewing and press the seam open or finish the seam allowance after it is sewn. I think the pattern did miss a couple so I made sure all my edges were serged. I also serged my hem and sleeves before folding them up and topstitching. On a heavier fabric I might be tempted to finish the raw edges with bias binding but for this I didn’t want a lot of extra bulk and that is a lot of extra work on a first try of a pattern.

The only other change I made to the Kochi pattern is how I attached the neckband. I decided to kick the Boho vibe up a notch and add a geometric trim insert in the seam. A great added detail without a lot of extra work. The first question was how to attached the neckband to one side of the trim? To keep a nice finished edge I folded the neckband right sides in and sandwiched the trim between the layers. Then, I stitched a long tube with 1/4″ seam, turned it right side out and pressed.

Neckband Hem Piece | Style Maker FabricsNext, to attach my new “neckband” to the kimono I finished off the front edge with the serger and pinned my neckband in place, starting at the back neck. Now for the trickiest part, at the hem I trimmed the neckband 3/4″ short of meeting the hem. Weird, right?

I also cut a roughly two 3″ squares from my fabric scraps and folded all the raw edges to the wrong side and folded this in half. This created a little hem for my neck band that is about the same width as the actual hem on the kimono. Lining everything up in place, I sandwiched each end of the neck band (about 1/2″) between the folded hem piece and top-stitched. You want to keep everything pinned so that it all lines up correctly.

Kochi Neckband Trimmed | Style Maker Fabrics

Last but not least, I stitched the finished neck band on using a 1/4″ seam allowance, taking care to catch only the edge of the decorative trim. Pressed the seam to the body of the kimono and I was set!!

Now for the big reveal…

Kochi Kimono Front | Style Maker Fabrics

Kochi Kimono Side | Style Maker Fabrics

My Kochi Kimono is the perfect addition to my summer wardrobe. I love how the fabric feels almost weightless and kind of catches in the breeze. And that print… so fun for this Boho style. It kind of reminds me of a bandanna or even henna designs. Overall, the fit is just right and I like the added length and the side slits and it the perfect layering piece for a warm day.

Kochi Kimono Trim Detail | Style Maker Fabrics

I am so happy with my choice to add the trim insert, such a fun extra detail and the finish turned out amazing. Trims like this are so easy to add to just about any garment—insert them in an existing seam, split a pattern piece and slip it in between or even cut off the hem and add it just above it. I was thinking after the fact that adding it to my kimono sleeve hems would be another great option. Maybe next time!

Kochi Kimono Back | Style Maker Fabrics

Guess I need to start thinking about a fall version. Any thoughts of fabric choice? Maybe a soft wool or go crazy and try a stable knit? Oh, and pair it with a turtle neck! So many ideas, not enough time to sew…

Michelle

Summer Watercolor Ebony Tunic

Redrawing the Ebony Pattern Pieces | Style Maker Fabrics

I have been practically living in my Closet Case Ebony Tees since first sewing up this pattern earlier this year! Now that summer is here in full force it is time to add another to my wardrobe.

Shibori Ebony Twirl | Style Maker Fabrics

While I love the amazing swing to the Ebony, sometimes all that extra fabric does get in the way and I long for a slimmer version. A few fellow sewists on Instagram tackled this issue using various methods but I decided to take the simple, straight forward approach. First, I traced a fresh copy of my front and back pieces on pattern tissue. On each piece, I then measured along the hem 6 inches from the side seam and drew a straight line up to the underarm. This decreased the circumference of the hem by about 24 inches (that seems like a ton, right?). I settled on the 6 inch amount by trying on my shibori version again and pinching in the side seams to get the fit I wanted—seemed like a good place to start.

Redrawing the Ebony Pattern Pieces | Style Maker Fabrics

With my pattern pieces trimmed down, I needed to make sure my side seams matched up. In looking at the original pieces, the back pieces should be trimmed/curved up to be even with the front. I laid the back piece over the front, matching the side seams at the under arms, and drew a gentle curve from the edge of the front piece out to the hem, shown below. With my alterations complete and I continued on as directed in the pattern and with the changes that I made previously for my 3/4-length raglan sleeve tunic.

Trimmed Ebony Pattern Pieces | Style Maker Fabrics

Now for the fun part, fabric choice! One of my favorite pieces in the shop right now is this watercolor stripe jersey knit. Lighter weight and perfectly drapey for a summer Ebony tee! I think my favorite part though it the color and the amazing movement and random look of the print. In cutting my pieces out I did my best to match up the “stripes” as best I could. The variegated look made this a bit more difficult and not an absolute match but close enough. I also decided to cut my sleeves out so they DID NOT match, embracing the abstract look of the knit.

Watercolor Stripe Jersey | Style Maker Fabrics

Sewing this Ebony up was quick and straight forward. I finished my necklines and hem with my cover-stitch machine for a professional look and I am loving the results!

Watercolor Ebony Front View | Style Maker Fabrics

I was worried I took out too much of the swing (24 inches is a lot!), but I think it was the just about the right amount, especially for the front. I might continue to tweak the back a bit, add a couple inches of swing back in and shorten the curve of the hem. Nothing major but I think these changes may help fix a bit of clinging that I noticed in wearing this top on repeat over the last week.

Watercolor Ebony Side View | Style Maker FabricsWatercolor Ebony Back | Style Maker FabricsWatercolor Ebony Front | Style Maker FabricsAll in all, I think my watercolor Ebony turned out to be the perfect addition for the summer wardrobe! And this pattern continues to move up my list of favorite patterns. If you haven’t sewing this one up yet, you need to now! And this jersey… I think the photos say it all!

Michelle

Tropical Summer Gallery Tunic

Tropical Gallery Tunic Front | Style Maker Fabrics

Summer has officially arrived! As temperatures finally are starting to increase here in the Pacific Northwest I have been looking at my warm weather wardrobe trying to figure out what it is missing and what I want. One item I keep coming back to is a RTW tunic that I absolutely love wearing. It is a soft, drapey rayon and perfectly over-sized— just the right combination for summer.

Ready to Wear Inspiration | Style Maker Fabrics

Rayon Tunic Ready to Wear Inspiration

In search for a pattern to create my own version I went to the sewing community on Instagram for advise. Hey June’s Cheyenne Tunic and Closet Case’s Kalle Shirt were among the recommendations, but the overwhelming response was to go with Liesl & Co.’s Gallery Tunic. Looking into this pattern further it includes the pleat details at the front and back and has that slightly over-sized relaxed look just like my favorite tunic. It is missing the gathered tabbed sleeves but that is something I can always add.Gallery Tunic Pattern | Style Maker Fabrics

Next, time to pick out fabric! I have been kind of obsessed with tropical prints this year and thought I should probably have a fun tropical shirt for the summer. Right!?

Tropical Fabrics Options | Style Maker Fabrics

With so many fun colors and patterns to choose from I decided to start out with my two favorite colors, blue and green. A little on the safe side I know but something that I can wear everyday and not feel like I should be on a beach somewhere.

Tropical Leaves Shirting | Style Maker Fabrics

In sewing up the pattern, the instructions are very clear and concise which is always appreciated. It also includes some great tips and tricks along the way that give you a very professional, finished look. I went with a size 8 in View A, the tunic length with a traditional collar, and didn’t make any major changes to the pattern. I did widen the sleeves at the elbow by about 1/2″ on either side, a standard adjustment for me.

Tropical Gallery Tunic Front | Style Maker Fabrics

This tunic came together quite quickly once I got the front pleat and placket done. The only other time intensive step was folding and pressing the curved baseball hem in place. As recommended in the pattern, taking your time with this step as the bias folding can be a bit tricky but turns out wonderfully with a little finesse and a good pressing!

Gallery Tunic Hem | Style Maker Fabrics

After putting this tunic on for the first time I never wanted to take it off! This rayon shirting was the perfect choice—soft and drapey like a rayon challis but just enough structure and stability that a more traditional cotton shirting might offer.

Tropical Gallery Tunic | Style Maker Fabrics

And let’s not forget to mention that leaf print! I love how this tunic length and curved hem really shows off the fabric. You also barley notice the pleats on the front and back and the color variation on those leaves is gorgeous!

Tropical Gallery Tunic Back | Style Maker Fabrics

All in all, a great first attempt at a me-made version of my favorite tunic. I think another version is in my near future with even wider sleeves and added tab detail. Hey June’s Cheyenne Tunic pattern will come in handy… This tropical version of the Gallery Tunic is sure to get lots of wear this summer! And I think I found a new go-to pattern to enjoy year round!

Michelle

Spring Style Blog Tour: Denim Jacket and Wide Leg Pants

To kick our Spring Style Tour 2017 I thought I would jump all in with a new spring jacket! The question was, which one? In perusing the spring styles in ready-to-wear two silhouettes kept jumping out at me, 1) a classic denim jacket and 2) a sporty bomber jacket.

The timing couldn’t have been more perfect with release of Named’s spring collection and the Maisa denim jacket. That pretty much made the decision for me, along with the arrival of this amazing washed bleached selvage denim. A match made in sewing heaven!

Named Maisa Jacket Pattern and Washed Selvage Denim | Style Maker Fabrics

Sewing this denim jacket was definitely a step out of my comfort zone. It wasn’t something I could whip up in an afternoon but was one of the most rewarding projects I have ever sewn. I didn’t make any changes to the pattern and sewed a straight size 40. Not only does it look like something I bought at a department store, it is also something I never thought I ever could/would sew. I haven’t had a denim jacket in my wardrobe in many years and I am excited to say that this one is handmade!

Maisa Selvage Denim Jacket | Style Maker Fabrics

A couple words of wisdom when sewing a Denim Jacket:

  1. Stock up on top-stitching thread! It is amazing how much you will use as you topstitch just about every seam… TWICE. (I might have had three machines going for this project- regular thread, top stitching thread and serger)
  2. Stock up on needles! Some of those pesky areas where the denim is many layers think can be hard on sewing machines, needles and your patience.
  3. Take your time and don’t rush- patience pays off and it will all come together in the end. Even when you don’t think it will!

To finish off the look I sewed up Megan Nielsen’s new Flint pants. Wide leg and super comfy these cropped trousers are perfect for spring/summer here in the Pacific Northwest. They are also the perfect pairing for my cropped denim jacket in this drapey olive twill!

Rayon Twill Flint Pants Front | Style Maker Fabrics

Rayon Twill Flint Pants Back | Style Maker Fabrics

In sewing my Flint pants I did take in the legs a bit after sewing them together and trying them on before I added the waist band. The legs were a little too wide for me and my style. I tapered in, starting just below the pocket, angling down each side to about 1-1/2″ in from the side seam at the hem. This took each leg in a total of about 6″. That sounds like a lot but they are still plenty wide for me! I also trimmed the length 1″ and hemmed as directed.

Overall, I love how my new spring look turned out! It pushed me out of my sewing comfort zone and jump started my spring wardrobe. I have already sewn up another jacket (Rigel bomber) to go with these pants! Watch for another post coming soon with all the details.

Follow along with us as the Spring Style Tour 2017 continues tomorrow with Day Two! We will be traveling up to Canada to see what Rachel of Maker Style has planned for spring.

Happy Spring Sewing!

Michelle

P.S. New to our Style Blog Tours? Check our the recaps from last spring and fall, HERE and HERE!

Statement Floral Safran Pants

Lately, I keep being drawn to florals— big, bold, striking florals! In fashion, I can’t help but love just about any pair of floral pants. I don’t know what it is but I love them! I’m not usually a floral person, but I think the juxtaposition of these bold prints on pants that creates something different that just draws you in. Add some unusual colors and crazy scale and case closed— I must make a pair now!

Floral Safran Pants Inspiration and Fabric Choices | Style Maker Fabrics

Perusing Pinterest, my favorite one-stop-shop for inspiration, I came across this outfit and knew this is the look I wanted to go for. Bold, fitted skinny jeans with a more casual top— simple but striking! I pulled a few fabric options, but settled on the one closest to my inspiration, a stretch sateen in rich reds, greens and a deep black background.

Deer & Doe Safran Pants | Style Maker Fabrics

Pants is one category of garments that continues to scare me a bit. While I have always had lofty goals of making a wardrobe full of the perfect pants, it just hasn’t happened. Whether it is the time, the fit, or whatever, I always find an excuse to avoid making them. Well, I am facing my fears and taking on a new pattern, Deer & Doe’s Safran Pants. I love the clean lines of this pattern and have been meaning to try it since we got it in the shop this fall.

Now, let’s get sewing! I settled on cutting a straight Size 42 based on my measurements, picking version B for the clean look and the ankle length. I raided my scrap bin for pocket pieces and got everything all cut and ready. Stitching my Safrans together was relatively easy and straight forward. Deer & Doe’s beautifully printed patterns offer each step broken down with easy to follow instructions and helpful diagrams. A couple of my favorite steps were the welt pockets and the zip fly. Both turned out perfectly and the instructions dissolved any fear and confusion I had about these more difficult techniques. Check out that pocket!

Floral Safran Pants | Side and Pocket | Style Maker FabricsI did baste my pants together to check fit, but I have found that that is more of a guideline to see if you are close. You can’t tell how they will really fit and feel until they are complete and you can try them out around the house. Not great, I know, but worth it in the long run. I am finding the more I pairs of pants I sew, the quicker the construction process is. This will make sewing multiple versions less painful and get me to the perfect pair of pants soon!

Completed Floral Safran Pants | Style Maker Fabrics

Overall, I am really happy with the look! I love this fabric and it is the perfect bold floral for a pair of skinny jeans. I still need to work on perfecting the pattern— I do have some whiskering around the crotch, as the pattern describes it, indicating I need to make the crotch a bit shallower on the front. I love that Deer & Does has included a couple pages of common fit issues and how to fix them! So helpful! I also plan on making them a bit longer on my next pair.

Floral Safran Pants Back | Style Maker Fabrics

To finish the look, I paired my fitted jeans with a slouchy Hemlock tee I made this winter out of a cozy sweater knit. Add a simple gold necklace and I was set. I definitely think keeping the rest of the outfit simple is the way to go, at least for me, and letting the pants really stand out. I like having one garment be the star and the rest of the look be the supporting cast!

Complete Look | Floral Safran Pants | Style Maker Fabrics

 

Best part of all— I have some amazing new floral pants just in time for Valentine’s Day! And I am well on my way to perfecting a new pants pattern. A few slight changes and maybe some of our new stretch denims for another pair of pants to enjoy this spring.

Happy Sewing!

Michelle

A New Wardrobe Basic— The Ebony Tee

This week one of our favorite indie pattern designers, Heather of Closet Case Files, released her tenth pattern, the Ebony Tee! It’s a classic tee in a fun swing style that you can’t help but sway, twist and twirl in. As knits are always one of my favorite things to sew, I immediately started laying out fabric choices and planning a couple Ebony Tees for myself.

Ebony Tee Pattern | Style Maker FabricsThe pattern calls for just about any weight knit depending on the look and style you want. I love the movement of this swing style so I wanted something that would drape nicely and hang closer to my body. I have been eyeing this shibori bamboo knit for a while now (its just so soft!) and thought the large scale of design would be perfect for this pattern. It also is a beautiful weight— not too heavy, not too light, with great stretch, recovery and a fluid drape. I also thought this comfy basic would be fantastic in a French terry. Since I can never have too much grey in my closet I picked out this variegated French terry. It’s closer in weight to a jersey, giving it lots of drape and making it a great choice for a cozy Ebony dress.

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Heather includes three different variation in the pattern— a cropped tee, mid-length dress and raglan tunic. She also includes different sleeve lengths and neckline options letting you design your Ebony to suit your style and wardrobe. I decided to keep my first version simple and go with the mid-length dress (View A) with long sleeves and a jewel neckline for my French terry— might as well take the comfort to the max right? I changed up my cutting layout by flipping my back piece over and rotating it 180 degrees. This maximized the size of my remaining fabric and let me out two sets of sleeves. I often find that sleeves don’t fit me quite right on the first go and since I had the space I planned to do a test set of sleeves.

Alternate Ebony Cutting Diagram | Style Maker Fabrics

Alternate pattern piece layout for the Ebony dress.

This planning paid off as the first sleeve was quite tight and not long enough. If your fabric is a bit narrower, you don’t have this space or your fabric is directional and you can’t flip the back, you could always sew a separate muslin of your trouble piece or even of the whole garment to test it out. I ended up widening the sleeves by half inch on either side and lengthening them by three inches. This pattern did not have the handy lengthen/shorten line on the sleeves so I used the sleeve side-seam notches as my lengthening point.

Other than those few changes, my Ebony dress was a breeze to sew together. I serged the entire garment and finished off the hems and neckline with my cover-stitch. Start to finish, I was done in an afternoon and am loving the results! Secret pajamas is the first thing that comes to mind. Paired with leggings or tight and I am set for a comfy day at home or out and about running errands. As this dress has so much body, I also tried belting it for a more fitted look.

Jumping right back into sewing, I selected the raglan tunic version (View C) using my shibori bamboo jersey. The high low hem of the tunic will really show off the dye pattern and be perfect to wear with jeans, my ultimate go-to! I decided to add three-quarter length sleeves and used my altered sleeves from View A as a guide. For a bit more relaxed fit, I widened the sleeves another half inch on either side and kept the added three inches in the length. For this version, as the fabric was a bit more directional, I did follow the cutting diagram as directed in the pattern. Again, construction was a snap using the serger and cover-stitch. I didn’t even have to change thread colors as I used white for both of my Ebonys!

Shibori Ebony Hem | Style Maker Fabrics Shibori Ebony Back | Style Maker Fabrics

Shibori Ebony Twirl | Style Maker Fabrics

After sewing both of these up I can definitely see why Heather has been living in her own Ebonys over the past we months as she was finalizing the pattern! While we were taking these photos I couldn’t help but twist and twirl. And check out that back! I love how this tunic length shows off the fabric so well. Did I mention it is as comfortable as it looks, if not so?!

Closet Case’s Ebony is a great variation on the classic tee and a fantastic way bring a new silhouette into your closet. I can’t wait to sew up more of these this spring. I’m thinking a stripe jersey might have to be next, what do you think? I definitely recommend this pattern, with so many options to choose from you are sure to fine the perfect match for you and your style!

Happy Sewing~

Michelle

Keeping Warm with the Esme Maxi Cardigan

Bundled Up in Esme Cardigan | Style Maker Fabrics

Every once in a while, the planets align and you find the fabric of your dreams for the perfect pattern— almost like a match made in heaven. It doesn’t happen everyday but when it does you know that all of that searching, designing and sewing are worth it!

Just recently I experienced just such an occasion! On one of our buying adventures this fall we stumbled across the most amazing chunky sweater knit from Italy. Of course we had to have it for the shop, in two colors I might add. When it arrived and I got to see it in a larger piece in all its glory, I knew instantly that it needed to be a long, cozy cardigan. Enter the Esme Maxi Cardigan from Named— the ideal fabric for the perfect pattern!

Named Esme Cardigan | Style Maker Fabrics Sweater Knit

With everything going on in December, I wasn’t able to get to this project. Of course, the one that I really wanted to sew, right? So I made it my goal to get it sewn in the new year. One week in and mission accomplished! Now for a closer look at the fabric, the pattern and the slight changes I made to suit my style.

First up, this fabric! It is probably one of the most stunning pieces we have had in the shop. It is wonderfully thick and cozy but the best part about it is the texture and the pattern. The undulating lines and varying thicknesses and textures in the knit give it amazing movement, shape and feel. I washed it up like I would anything else and it came out even softer and more huggable. I could already tell this is going to be a cardigan that I am never going to want to take off!

Italian Chunky Sweater Knit | Style Maker Fabrics

Italian Chunky Sweater Knit

Now, the question of how to cut this maxi cardigan out? I decided to start with the back and have one of the curving designs go right up the middle. I did redraw the back piece so that I had the full back (instead of one half) and could make sure I got it centered correctly. The “straight lines” in the knit also proved to be quite helpful! With the back cut out, it was on to the front. Each side is made up of two piece, above and below the pockets, and I was able to cut these out so that not only they were mirrored but they also would match perfectly when I sewed them together.

The sleeves also got the smaller wavy pattern centered on each of them so they matched. With the fabric that I had left I cut out the front button stand, the cuffs and the pockets. I tried to play with the texture/size of the knit pattern and its placement on the cardigan. I went for the thicker texture down the front and back, especially around the shoulders and chose the lighter texture for the sleeves and the button band. A great use of the fabric and really shows off all its dimensions.

Esme Sleeve Placement | Style Maker Fabrics

Sleeve Placement on the Chunky Sweater Knit

Construction proved to be relatively easy. The only kind of fussy parts were attaching the pockets, which was actually very similar to my Tamarack jacket, and attaching the button stand. I used the stretch stitch on my machine as designated in the pattern but I think I could have just went with my serger for most of these steps. That would have saved a lot of time! That stretch stitch is a slow one! I also went with my cover stitch machine for the stitching the hem and finishing the button band. With the grey thread that I had, the stitches were barely noticeable and it helped give the back side a nice finished look.

Cover Stitched Cardigan Hem | Style Maker Fabrics

Cover Stitched Hem and Button Band

Now for the changes… I find myself always tweaking a pattern slightly to suit what I have envisioned for it. My first change on my Esme was the length. After perusing Pinterest for styling over-sized cardigans, I settled on knee length or just above. Before I even cut anything out I took 6 inches off the back, lower front and button stand. After getting my cardigan “mostly” together I decided another 6 inches needed to come off. This gave me the perfect length and I think it is a change a lot of people have made as well.

Pinterest Cardigan Inspiration | Style Maker Fabrics

Pinterest Styling Inspiration

The next change came in the fit. In trying the cardigan on after it was assembled but not finished I thought there was way too much bulk under the arms. I think that is the style for this cardigan, over-sized and slouchy, great for an overcoat but not the “sweater” I was going for. The thickness of this knit also made it kind of bunching under the arms and felt a little weird.

To adjust this I laid the cardigan flat and marked about 3 inches along the sleeve seam at the underarm. Using chalk, I then drew a line tapering down the body and back out to the original seam, roughly just above the pocket seam. In the other direction I tapered down the arm and back out to the original seam about mid arm. I then serged along this line, taking care to match up the sleeve seams as I went. The results were perfect, they gave my cardigan a bit more of a fitted look while still keeping it relaxed and a little slouchy.

Altered Cardigan Underarm | Style Maker Fabrics

Altered Underarm and Removed Bulk

Last but not least, I threw out the cuffs and skipped the buttons! I attached one cuff and decided to just hem the sleeves instead— less bulk and much simpler. I also decided to go with an open style cardigan so the buttons were unnecessary (and it saved me from making button holes!).

Let’s see the results! I absolutely love how this cardigan turned out! Not only does it show of this fabric better than any other pattern could, it is also the warmest, coziest thing I have ever made. Perfect for the below freezing temperatures we have had this winter. And, yes that is snow in the pictures and it is over a week old. That is how cold it is!

Esme Cardigan Side View | Style Maker Fabrics

Esme Cardigan Front | Style Maker Fabrics

Esme Cardigan Back | Style Maker Fabrics

Bundled Up in Esme Cardigan | Style Maker Fabrics

Overall, my maxi cardigan turn out exactly how I imagined it— don’t you love it when that happens? I will definitely be revisiting this pattern and hopefully soon! I’d love to try a lighter weight knit, like a jersey or lighter sweater knit. Maybe try something like True Bias’ recent make. Anyway, definitely check out the Esme Maxi Cardigan, it is perfect for this mid-winter weather!

Stay warm and happy sewing,

Michelle

P.S. We are so excited to announce that a selection of Named patterns are now available in the shop, including the Esme Maxi!

 

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